The Best Cycling Gloves

The Best Cycling Gloves For All Cycling

Cycling gloves make a world of difference to your riding experience. Sore hands, wrists and friction burns can all be avoided by investing a good pair of gloves.


We all know that protecting your hands is vital. We’ve been on the hunt to find the best value cycling gloves around, and we have some exciting discoveries to share with you. As it turns out, a good pair of cycling gloves doesn’t need to cost the world.

Don’t waste money on big brands just for the sake of it; there are plenty of cycling gloves from renowned brands that are terrible in comparison to some of the cheaper ones. We’ve put more than a handful to the test to see which come out on top.

The Best Cycling Gloves

Let’s get down to business. Though personal preference plays a part in the level and type of padding the glove has, we’re pretty confident our selections cater to the vast majority of cyclists.

We’ve kept value for money at the forefront of our search criteria, and haven’t been afraid to drift away from major brand names to seek the best value. Here are the best cycling gloves for cyclists of all ages, skill levels, and disciplines.

Louis Garneau Men’s Biogel RX-V Cycling Gloves

The Biogel RX-V cycling gloves from Louis Garneau are, in our humble opinion, some of the highest quality cycling gloves ever made. The vibration absorption achieved by the gel padding makes light work of even the bumpiest of roads, with only very little rattling making it past the palm of your hands.

In the past, we’ve shied away from gel-padded gloves due to a lack of breathability. Here though, the X-shaped vents present in these cycling gloves alleviate this almost entirely. They are comfortable beyond all expectations and allow ample airflow at a price that isn’t too far above the average for cycling gloves. If you can stretch a little further to afford these, you’d be silly not to.

Giro DND Full-Fingered Cycling Gloves

On the hunt for full-fingered cycling gloves? Look no further than Giro’s DND (Down and Dirty) gloves. Four-way stretch construction allows these gloves to have one of the snuggest fits while remaining comfortable and allowing plenty of mobility. Coupled with a suede palm to reduce annoying bunching, these genuinely push the bar higher than most other manufacturers manage to achieve today.

Flex zones at the knuckles and reinforced fingertips make for a durable cycling glove that’s suitable even for mild off-roading. Despite this, they truly excel on the road, where they feel as light and airy as half-fingered gloves even in warmer months. A truly impressive cycling glove that leaves you hard-pressed to find a single fault.

Gearonic Half Finger Cycling Gloves

Stray a little further from the cycling gloves of established brand names and you can end up with either a total bargain or a total catastrophe. Thankfully, we’re happy to mark these as an absolute bargain.

They feel as sturdy as any half-fingered cycling glove we’ve ever used. Plenty of padding on the top of the palm allows for a firm grip that feels effortless to maintain, and elasticized microfibre makes them incredibly comfortable even in flex zones. At a fraction of the price of their main brand competitors, it’s not hard to see why these are some of the best selling cycling gloves around today.

Giro Men’s Strate Dure Supergel Cycling Gloves

We’ve raved about Giro’s full-fingered gloves plenty of times; they’re one of our favorite cycling gloves around. Naturally then, we had very high hopes indeed for their Strate Dure Supergel half-fingered gloves.

Thankfully, the padding is excellent here, taking away annoying jolts and shunts almost effortlessly. The breathability is second to none, and we think you’d have trouble finding a more comfortable cycling glove for long rides. The downsides? There are few, but one small gripe is that they honestly don’t feel that much more durable than some of the budget picks, and that’s a little disappointing from a glove that carried a significantly higher price tag.

Fox Racing Ranger Mountain Bike Gloves

Fox’s Ranger Mountain Bike gloves might seem an odd choice for a list that has been so far focused around road cycling gloves. In our opinion, they’d have been better off marketing them at road cyclists or more casual mountain bikers. They excel on roads, where their apparent lack of padding is a clear benefit rather than a concern out on the trails.

They feel more like a soft latex glove than a heavy-duty mountain bike glove, which is ideal for long, smooth trips where you’re unlikely to be thrown over the handlebars. Despite their misguided marketing, these are fantastic cycling gloves that you can pick up for considerably less money than some of the front-runners in this market.

A Guide To Buying The Best Cycling Gloves

Cycling Gloves In Use

Whether you are a seasoned pro or a new cyclist just starting, you could almost definitely benefit from a good pair of bicycling gloves. As with any item of cycling apparel, the number of options on the market can be overwhelming, to say the least.

This article is designed to help guide you through the available options and hopefully match features to your individual preferences. The right pair of gloves for you will depend on how you ride your bike, the weather conditions you ride in, and your budget.

Advantages of Good Cycling Gloves

In many ways, having a good pair of bike gloves is just as important as having a great helmet or the proper padded riding shorts. Here are just a few ways that they help you out:

An accident on a bicycle can be incredibly dangerous, any amount of protection is welcome, and your hands are certainly worth protecting.

They prevent your grip from slipping on the handlebars, helping you retain control of the bike during light impacts; keeping you safe from accidents.

They stop blisters. When your hands are rubbing up against a metal surface for long periods, blisters become inevitable. A good pair of bike gloves can save you from that pain and ensure you don’t ease off on gripping the bar.

They help keep your hands warm. Your average pair of winter gloves may not be safe to use when riding. A full-fingered pair of cycling gloves can help keep your hands nice and toasty during the cold months. Numb fingers lead to a lack of control.

Parts of Cycling Gloves

There are four main parts of cycling gloves. They are:

Fingers

Cycling loves can either be full-fingered or partial. It may be a good idea to have one of each for different weather conditions.

Full fingered gloves are great for winter riding while partial fingered ones can offer the protection and grip while not overheating your hands. Half fingered cycling gloves allow lots of air through the glove to counteract the heat generated by friction between your hands and the glove’s padding. The benefits of this airflow are especially noticeable in heavily padded cycling gloves.

Cuffs

The cuff refers to the part of the glove that goes around your wrist. In a good pair of cycling gloves, this will be adjustable so that the fit can be customized to you personally.

If the fight is too tight, it can cut off circulation and limit mobility significantly. On the other hand, if the fit is too loose, you will not have the snug fit that most cyclists desire to get good coverage on the handlebars.

Uppers

The back of cycling gloves is known as the upper. Here, you’ll find extra protection from the elements, and usually, a durable fabric to protect the hands during impacts.

Palm

For many cyclists, this is the most critical part of the gloves. The padding here can help you not get blisters or sore hands. It is also where any material to help with grip is added. Getting the palm of your glove right makes a world of difference, you should aim to find a balance between padding and airflow should.

Features to Look for in Cycling Glove

Glove features showcased

There is a lot of variety with regards to build-quality in the biking gloves on the market today. There are several things you should pay attention to when shopping for yours to be sure you are getting something that will last:

Types of Cycling Gloves

Depending on your intended use for your gloves, there are a few different options available to you. It might be advantageous to buy two or more pairs for your rides. Here are the most popular types:

Full Finger Gloves

These are usually associated with winter riding, but more breathable summer versions do exist. A good pair of winter cycling gloves will be light and flexible while still providing all of the protection you need to stay safe.

Silicone fingers are a great feature here, given you’re more likely to have wet hands in the winter. Some have reflective pieces to help with safety at night.

Summer Mitts

To qualify as “mitts,” the gloves must be finger-less. They give you the extra padding to help with comfort and gripping. They also offer some protection in the event of a fall. You can even get some that have a special pad on the back for wiping the sweat off.

Winter Gloves

If you plan on riding in freezing temperatures, you will need to find authentic winter gloves. Look for thermal gloves that are windproof and waterproof.

For winter gloves to be effective, they are typically comprised of a few layers.

A microporous membrane will help your hands breathe during a long ride. Keep in mind that winter gloves will have to be bulkier than others.

Materials for Cycling Gloves

Gloves designed for bike riding are frequently made using synthetic materials. Different materials have different advantages and disadvantages. Here are some of the most common ones:

Sweaty hands can lead to losing your grip on your handlebars, which in turn leads to disaster. Unprotected hands on the pavement will result in quite a lot of pain. Hours of riding with nothing between your skin and your handlebars can lead to blisters.

All of these things can are avoidable with the right pair of cycling gloves. Ultimately, it may take more than one pair to fit all of your needs.

Final Thoughts

A good pair of cycling gloves can add to the comfort and enjoyment of your rides. Doing your research and reading bike glove reviews can make sure you end up with gloves that will last you for many rides to come.

Hopefully, this article gave you a good starting point for finding the right ones for you and suggested some suitable cycling gloves to fit your needs.